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STATE & DIVISIONS
MON | KAREN | KACHIN | CHIN | RAKHINE | SOUTHERN SHAN | NORTHERN SHAN | EASTERN SHAN | YANGON |
BAGO | MAGWAY | MANDALAY | SAGAING | THINTHAYNE | AYERWADDY |

SAGAING DIVISION

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Sagaing Division is in the northwest of Mandalay between Kachin and Chin States. In the west, it has common border with India. Sagaing on the west bank of the Ayarwaddy with Mandalay on the opposite bank is the capital of the division. Neighboring towns are ShweBo, the first capital of the Konbaung Dynasty, and Monywa, the chief commercial city on the Chin Dwin River. Kawlin and Wuntho are famous for the gold mines. Uru Chaung and Khamti are no less famous towns for their jade and gold mines. Indaw and Pantha have natural gas-fields and Kalaywa has coal mines. Tamu is a border town serving as a gateway to the country for travelers from India. ChinDwin River start to flow down from Khamti and pass through Htamanti, Homalin, Mawlak, Kalaywa, and Monywa until it meets with Ayarwaddy River near MyinChan. The railway line heading Myitkyina in Kachin State passes through Sagaing Division. There also is a railway line linking Sagaing, Monywa and Budalin. The towns in the division are easily accessible by road.

Sagaing
        Once an ancient capital, Sagaing lies 21 km south west of Mandalay, beside the Ayarwaddy River. The Sagaing Hills are dotted with pagodas and there are over 500 monasteries, a retreat for some 6000 monks and nuns. Soon U Ponya Shin Pagoda, Kaung Mudaw Pagoda (a copy of the Mahaceti Pagoda in Sri Lanka), and Ywa Htaung village (home of the silversmiths' guilds) are places worth visiting.

Sagaing Photo Gallery


Monywa
        Monywa is a city in central Myanmar and situated on the eastern bank of the Chindwin Rive, Mandalay Division. It lies 136 km north-west of Mandalay along the Mandalay-Budalin branch railway line. Monywa serves as a major trade center for India and Burma through Kalay Myo road and Chindwin river.
        The name Monywa comes from "Mon" meaning "cake or snack food" and "Ywa" which is the Myanmar word for village. There is a legend which says that in the old days a Myanmar king fell in love with a seller of cakes from this town and made her his queen. The original name some say, is Mon - thema- ywa or " Village of the woman cake seller". There has been a big village at Monywa from the Bagan Period. The classical name for Monywa is Thalawadi. The chronicles mention that Monywa was one of the places where King Alaungphayar encamped for the night on his campaign to Manipur in 1758. During the Myanmar kings' time Monywa remained just a big village as the administrative centre for the region was at Ahlon. It was only a year after the Annexation of 1886 that Monywa became the Headquarters of the Lower Chindwin District. In the last few years with the legalizing of the border trade with India, Monywa has grown into a bustling trading.
        In Monywa town, there are busy markets, popular restuarants, a Degree College affiliated to Mandalay University, a Technical High School, and soon there will be an Institute of Economics, the second after the one in Yangon.
        Monywa Hotel, now privatised, has comfortable four-room bungalows with attached amenities, all air-conditioned. centre, second only to Mandalay in the Upper Myanmar region.
        If you are travelling to Monwya by car you should stop about 20 kilometres before you reach the town to visit this most unusual Buddhist temple complex on 37 acres of land which is part of the Mohnyin Forest Monastery retreat. The pagoda was started on 20th June 1939 and completed on 2nd March 1952.It was the brain-child of the famous Mohnyin Sayadaw whose life-like effigy can be seen nearby.
        If you can go at the beginning of the Myanmar month of Tazaungmone ( usually around November), you can see the annual pagoda festival, which goes on for several days when the villagers from all around come to enjoy the music and dancing, and buy from the various stalls set up by sellers from all over the country.

Thanboddhay Pagoda
        If you are travelling to Monwya by car you should stop about 20 kilometres before you reach the town to visit this most unusual Buddhist temple complex on 37 acres of land which is part of the Mohnyin Forest Monastery retreat. The pagoda was started on 20th June 1939 and completed on 2nd March 1952.It was the brain-child of the famous Mohnyin Sayadaw whose life-like effigy can be seen nearby.
        Some visitors say that this Pagoda reminds them of Borobodur, as it is similar in architectural design. Unlike Borobodur this is a modern place of worship, well maintained, and with interesting samples of modern Buddhist art. There are many different Buddha images, row upon row in ascending tiers in niches along the walls: the total number is 582, 257, an amazing figure! Unlike most of the pagodas in Myanmar, the entrance is not guarded by Chinthes, the mythical lions, but by statues of a pair of magnificant white elephants which are sacred and auspicious in Buddhist symbolism.
        Thanboddhay is the only pagoda with this unique shape in the whole country. The square temple base (each side about 166 feet) which worshippers can enter is topped by receding terraces, with myriads of small stupas (864 in number) surrounding the central golden chedi, 132 feet in height.
        Tourists can study and take photos of the twenty tagundaing, huge decorated pillars, and also big masonary fruits in the shape of bunches of bananas and coconuts, water melon, mangos, jackfruits, papaya and so on . These fruits are also objects of veneration for the local farmers.
        If you can go at the beginning of the Myanmar month of Tazaungmone ( usually around November), you can see the annual pagoda festival, which goes on for several days when the villagers from all around come to enjoy the music and dancing, and buy from the various stalls set up by sellers from all over the country.

Travel Tips
Entrance Fees : US$5

Bodhi Tahtaung and Po Khaung Taung
        From Thanboddhay Pagoda you can go by car about five miles along a good branch road to Po Khaung Taung, a small range of hills in the Monywa area. There you will see more unusual sights not found in other parts of Myanmar.
        First you should stop for a while in the fast growing forest of one thousand Bodhi trees (Ficus religiosa); this Bo or pipal tree is sacred to all Buddhists because Gaudama Buddha attained Enlightenment while meditating under this tree.
        A much venerated Sayadaw now popularly known as the Bodhi Tahtaung Sayadaw who can make your wishes come true, first started planting this forest grove about two decades ago. Each tree has a large Buddha image underneath, and many Buddhist come to pay obseisance there. It is a pleasant, peaceful place, filled with the song of birds, in a protected environment where nature and men are in perfect harmony.
        Just beyond Bodhi Tahtaung, a short stroll towards the east will bring you to the Po Khaung Taung, a range of hills where you can see one of the largest reclining Buddha images in the world. Measuring 300 ft in length it is even bigger than the colossal Shwethalyaung reclining Buddha image in Bago (Pegu) which has a length of 180 ft. only. The head is 60 ft. in height. It was only built in 1991 and up to now there is still no roof or shelter to protect it from the elements.
        This huge image has a hollow cave-like structure inside and you can walk from the head to the feet. You will then see inside 9,000 one foot high metal images of the Buddha and his disciples in various postures. There are also representations of some of the important events in the life of the Buddha.
        If you are interested in Buddha footprints you can study the 108 auspicious symbols which are depicted on the soles of this huge image.

Aung Sakkya Pagoda
        Near the reclining Buddha image, also on Po Khaung Taung range is the Aung Sakkya Pagoda , 441.75 ft in height (including the base of 216.75 ft).
        This pagoda is a landmark for the area around Monywa as it can be seen from afar. It is surrounded by 1,060 smaller satellite pagodas which shelter over a thousand sacred images of the Buddha.

Pho Win Hill
        The hills have probably been occupied since the dawn of human habitation in Myanmar; to the south - west lies the Pon Daung Pon Nya mountain range, where the fossilised remains of Pontaung Mon's may have lived 30 million years ago - were found.
        The caves themselves contain Buddhist statues and murals dating to the 17th and 18th centuries. Most exhibit the Inwa style, though some may date as for back as the 14th to16th centuries. A covered stairway climbs a hill to the main cave shrine, but there are dozens of large and small caves in the area filled with old Buddha images. There are over 400,000 images in these and other nearby caves.

 

Shwe Ba Hill
        Shwe Ba Hill, just beyond Pho Win Hill, features unique pavilions cut from the surrounding sandstone and filled with plain Buddha images. Shweba Taung is on the West Bank of Chindwin river.
        There, temples and caves are curved out of volcanic rocks and inside walls of some caves are decorated with 13 century / 18 century mural paintings.

Travel Tips
Entrance Fees : US$5

Shwe Gu Ni Pagoda
        The Shwe Gu Ni Pagoda is about 20 miles east of Monywa. The Buddha image in the pagoda is offered (stick) by gold foils and the face of the Buddha image could not be make out very easily. Typical black and gold lacquerware from nearby Kyaukka is the festival's speciality. Held from the 5th to the 8th waning day of Kason. Shweguni Pagoda is famous for its magnificent architecture.

Nearby Attractions

        Monywa can also be the base for visiting Kyaukka. Kyaukka , a town about ten miles to the east, second only to Bagan as a center for the Myanmar lacquer-ware cottage industry. A few hours drive will also bring you to Twintaung hill, an extinct volcano whose crater now forms a beautiful lake. The surrounding area has lush vegetation, and views of the area from the rim of this crater lake is breathtaking.
        The Ledi Kyaung Monastery is also well worth visiting. Built by the famous Ledi Sayadaw, a renowned Pali scholar, there are now 806 stone slab inscriptions which preserve some of the Sayadaw's writings.
        A few hours drive will also bring you to Twin Taung Hill, an extinct volcano whose crater now forms a beautiful lake. The surrounding area has lush vegetation, and there are lovely views of the area from the rim of this crater lake.
        Visitors are welcome to travel to Monywa and environs; see the interesting places and scenic views, and take back memorable experiences of typical Myanmar warmth and hospitality.


Naga Land
        Naga Land is the land at Sagaing Division, North-West of Myanmar near India Border, where Naga Hill Tribes are living. Khamti, LayShe, Lahe, NanYun are the Naga's Towns. The snow-capped Mt Sarameti on Naga Hills is 3,828 metres high. Unfrequented by man, the area invites adventurers. With airports Kalaymyo and Khamti serve as base camps for tours.
        The name Naga embraces a number of Indo Mongoloid tribes who speak a distant Tibeto Burman Language and live in the mountain regions of the India and Myanmar border. The Patkai Range in Northern Myanmar is home to the country estimated 100,000 Nagas.
            There are round about 64 clans in Naga Tribes and for centuries they have been fighting among themselves and other people in their region.
        Nagas traditionally build their villages on the summit of a hill or spur running off a mountain range 3,000 or 4,000 feet above sea level. They sought this hilly type specially for defense purpose and build protective stonewall, dyke of fence. Most Naga enjoy hunting as a sport as well as means of obtaining meat. They hunt tigers, leopards and wild boars with guns and spears aided by dogs. Traps are used for small animals and birds.
        Traditionally fierce warriors and until recently headhunters. The Nagas have defended their land against incursions by invaders. Unlike the Was, who took human skulls to safeguard their society and crops. The Nagas killed for personal glory and for the glory of their villages. The practice of head hunting is believed to have died out in the past twenty years. Although Nagas would not buy skulls like the Was sometime did, slaves were bought to be decapitated for their skulls and their heads were hung in baskets high in bamboo groves with arrow driven through the eye sockets to ensure that the ghost would protect the village.
        naga1.jpg (43729 bytes)The elder wears two large white shells over his ears. A sign of great wealth and standings, so distant from the coast, shells were historically used by hill people as a form of currency and are still highly prized by many ethnic group in Myanmar Historically, Nagas were unrecognized, but the government is considering the establishment Naga self zone under Myanmar new constitution.
        The derivation of the name Naga is not very clear, but believe it comes from the Sanskrit word Naga, means mountain and in form Naga comes from the word Nok means people in some Tibeto Burman language.
        The Nagas celebrates their New Year festival, every year in January. Men and women from various clans would pours into the town of Khamti on the Chin Dwin river, a few miles walk from the Indian border. Young Naga Men would stay in a bachelor house or "Morung" which is decorated with carved snakes or animals.


        A Naga chief would sits with his warriors for an official ceremony. The dyed red monkey fur plume distinguishes him on his headdress and a vast array of cowry shells adorning his costumes and sash, a sign of great wealth in the clan.
        Every Naga village traditionally contains a Morung, a sleeping place for unmarried men who go there as boys from the age of six or seven.
        Unmarried boys and girls work together for long period in the fields and are allowed to choose their marriage partner, although a bride price is common.
        In recent years, however, many Nagas have become Christians, their indigenous religion is still strong. Almost all traditional religious ceremonies are designed to protect and increase crops. Nagas proscribe many activities on certain days on religious grounds, the most important ceremony is the individual or village during which works and contact with the outside world are avoided. Some Nagas believe that good souls go to a place towards the sun, while the evil is destined for a terrible place in the direction of the sunset.
        Naga Traditional New Year Festival celebrates annually on 15 January.

Naga Land Photo Gallery

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